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Helicopter sim with glass panel

Posted: Wed Jan 20, 2021 12:51 am
by navymustang
Here is a copilot view of the main instrument panel. This is a military helicopter for maritime anti submarine work. All three displays are Air Manager. The Garmin G5 is also Air Manager. THis is a major work in progress. Note - I am using AM 4.0 beta since I need to have joystick inputs along with Arduino support.
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Re: Helicopter sim with glass panel

Posted: Wed Jan 20, 2021 2:22 am
by lonespace
Wow that looks awesome! I assume those are custom instruments?

Re: Helicopter sim with glass panel

Posted: Sat Feb 27, 2021 4:37 pm
by fbacker
Incredible look.

Re: Helicopter sim with glass panel

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2021 9:29 am
by jph
navymustang wrote:
Wed Jan 20, 2021 12:51 am
Here is a copilot view of the main instrument panel. This is a military helicopter for maritime anti submarine work. All three displays are Air Manager. The Garmin G5 is also Air Manager. THis is a major work in progress. Note - I am using AM 4.0 beta since I need to have joystick inputs along with Arduino support.
Lovely work, really top notch.
Can I just ask, are the 'joystick inputs' intended for the flight controls ? (especially the cyclic) ?
Joe.

Re: Helicopter sim with glass panel

Posted: Wed Mar 17, 2021 12:50 am
by navymustang
All flight controls are string pots read by a Leo Bodner card then input to P3d v5 via FSUIPC calibration.

All displays and Lua code for the Arduino cards are handled by Air Manager. All displays are custom.

Re: Helicopter sim with glass panel

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 3:09 pm
by jph
navymustang wrote:
Wed Mar 17, 2021 12:50 am
All flight controls are string pots read by a Leo Bodner card then input to P3d v5 via FSUIPC calibration.

All displays and Lua code for the Arduino cards are handled by Air Manager. All displays are custom.
Ah, Ok, thanks, I thought for a minute you may be trying to use AM pot inputs for a high precision control.
I was wondering what you were using for the cyclic as the precision needs to be absolutely superb - as you most likely well know.
Most times it is fingertip flying in the cyclic. I don't have time in a heavy helicopter, but (many years ago!) do have time in light rotary craft such as the low inertia 2 blade R22.
It is really difficult in a sim to get the precision and resolution needed for the cyclic control at the very near centre point and with absolutely no dead zone.
Many are using Hall effect 14 / 16 bit ADC units with good results. The Bodner lower precision units are also extremely good with excellent results providing the travel is appropriate. Nice job !
Can you clarify what you mean by 'string' pots (potentiometers) ?
Thanks
Joe

Re: Helicopter sim with glass panel

Posted: Mon Mar 22, 2021 9:25 pm
by navymustang
A string pot is a multi-turn potentiometer where the shaft has a spring loaded string . You pull it out of the case and when doing that it rotates the shaft. It retracts under spring tension.
If you go to Amazon and type in string potentiometer, you will see dozens for sale. Simple to use, just match the length of draw for the string and the resistance you need. A bit pricy, but as you mentioned - we need lots of precision.

Re: Helicopter sim with glass panel

Posted: Tue Mar 23, 2021 3:38 pm
by jph
navymustang wrote:
Mon Mar 22, 2021 9:25 pm
A string pot is a multi-turn potentiometer where the shaft has a spring loaded string . You pull it out of the case and when doing that it rotates the shaft. It retracts under spring tension.
If you go to Amazon and type in string potentiometer, you will see dozens for sale. Simple to use, just match the length of draw for the string and the resistance you need. A bit pricy, but as you mentioned - we need lots of precision.
Thanks for that - Not a unit I have come across before. Very interesting indeed. I can certainly see the attraction when using original hardware where a quasi linear motion may well be the ideal. I am exploring options for hall effect sensors at the moment - (home brew) as some of the new - meaning I have only seen them in the correct sizes at sensible prices in the last few weeks - custom bar magnets (2cm to > 6cm) appear to offer a few nice options for small arc or linear operation. The idea of the wire coil on bobbin is so simple yet so elegant though. Thanks for clarifying that. I will keep that option in mind.
Joe.